Cleaning Ceramic Tile Flooring Basics

Water Damage To Tile Flooring – How It Can Be Prevented

Floor Tiles Get Loose After Water Damage

One of the main issues that water damage causes to your tile flooring is that it can make it loosen up over time. That’s because the adhesive that’s holding your tiles into position will slowly be deteriorated by the presence of excess moisture. When you’re trying to use proper tile care, one of the first things that you should do is make sure that water isn’t allowed to pool on top of your tiles for very long. Wipe up spills and messes before water has the time to seep down below your tiles and do damage to the subfloor and the tile itself

If you notice that tiles in your home are beginning to loosen up and stop sticking to the floor like they are supposed to, this is often a clear sign that you have water damage that you don’t know about. That’s why it’s a good idea to check your tile flooring regularly. You won’t know if you need to make a tile repair until you go looking for problems, and after looking you might realize that you have quite a few issues that need caring for.

If you notice one or two tiles coming loose, pull them up so that you can see what sort of damage has occurred down below. Often you’ll see that the lower floor is rotting away and you have a serious issue that you need to take care of. Do yourself a favor and fix up any water leaks that are present and then care for all flooring and tile that’s affected by the water damage. Usually, many surrounding tiles will be damaged as well, even if they haven’t become loose just yet, so check thoroughly.

What Should Be Done About Water Under Bathroom Floor Tiles?

If you notice any signs of water under bathroom tile flooring, you’ll have to take a few different steps to sort out the issue. The very first step, before you worry about things like tile repair or tile care, is to find out where the water is coming from. If it’s from something like flooding, or a burst pipe that you already cared for, you can skip this step. However, if you aren’t sure what’s causing the water damage you need to get a pro into your home to locate the source of the damage.

After you go through the trouble of stopping the water leak, you can move on to repairing any damage that was done by the water. If you have tiles that are suffering from the damage, chances are good other surfaces are also damaged. It’s time for you to remove any damaged tiles so that you can look at everything else underneath. Cut out any subfloor that’s damaged and replace it with a fresh product. After you get all the subfloor issues worked out, you can start focusing on tile repair.

Important Things to Consider While Purchasing Flooring Tiles For Your Home

Having decided to revamp the look of your old, dreary-looking floor, take some time to research and look for modern, durable, trendy, and highly-quality floor tiles options. There are countless flooring tile options available but not all of them can suit your requirements. At some places, you may focus more on looks and aesthetics while at some, durability may be your major concern. Here, we bring you top 5 factors to keep in mind before purchasing flooring tiles for your home. Considering these factors, you can kick up the style and look of your home.

Size Matters

Size is one of the most important factors that demands your undivided attention. If you are looking for floor tiles for a spacious spaces, you must choose big-sized tiles like 100×200 cm, 120×120 cm, 120×180 cm, 80×120 cm etc. These sizes are also appropriate for medium room size as larger tiles make the area appear bigger than it is.

Finishes

Before choosing perfect tiles from an incredible selection, look for diverse finishes that can you adorn your home in a distinctive style. Some of the best choices available are polished, matt, wooden, metallic, marbletech, carving and rustic finishes and depending on overall décor of your abode, you can choose a finish that goes perfectly well with your sense of style.

Material

The most popular and commonly used floor tiles Material options are ceramic, vitrified, glass, cement, and mosaic. Most often, people decide to go with ceramic or vitrified tiles for their home as it is a highly durable material and is available in multiple designs, colours, and patterns. Thus, it offers an eclectic blend of durability and aesthetic appearance. These tiles are highly resistant to wear and tear and do not easily get stained, chipped or cracked. If the area where these tiles are going to be installed experiences heavy foot traffic, these tile options proves to be the right choice.

Anti-Slip Tiles

Another factor that needs to be considered is resistance to water. If you are looking for suitable flooring options in areas like the bathroom and kitchen, you will have to choose tiles that provides enough grip and comes with anti-slip features. Matt finish tiles is one of the best bathroom tile options

Things You Need To Know About Floor Tiles

Not all floor tiles are made the same or from the same material. You should get to know the categories of tiles. These categories are glazed porcelain, polished porcelain, unglazed matt porcelain, unglazed rock face porcelain, ceramic tiles, glazed matt porcelain, glazed polished porcelain and natural stone.

Floor Tiles Idea – Advantages And Disadvantages

Each floor tile has both advantages and disadvantages, so knowing what you need for your job is just as important as knowing your tile categories. For instance, if you are buying tiles for an uncovered outdoor area, it’s worth considering an anti-slip tile.

Cheapest Prices

Once you have selected the brands and types of tiles you are after, shop for the cheapest prices. Don’t pay more than you have to. Tile Factory Outlet is known for having the cheapest floor tiles in Sydney but they also carry all of the above brand name tiles

Lay your floor tiles once and lay them right. Make sure you use a tiler who has a good reputation and buy the tile adhesive and grout for him

Here’s Exactly How to Clean Your Tile Floors

Take care of your tile floors with a gentle hand and a few smart cleaning techniques that will keep your tiles and grout looking like new. Learn how to clean your tile floors, how to clean tile grout, which cleaning products and tools to use and how often your floors need to be cleaned.

Your kitchen or bathroom isn’t fully clean until you’ve scrubbed the floors. Although you don’t have to tackle this chore every time you wipe down the countertops, it’s important to keep an eye on your tile floors for signs of dirt or grime. A hazy film or dirty grout are both indicators that your floors need more than a cursory sweeping. When it’s time to clean your tile floors, be sure to use the proper technique for your type of tile as the recommended cleaners and mops vary between materials. These are the best ways to clean your tile floors no matter what material it’s made of

How to Clean Tile Floors of All Types

You wouldn’t wash a stainless-steel refrigerator with a cleaner meant for an enamel surface. The same concept applies to your tile. While tile floors are incredibly durable, certain kinds of tile need to be cared for in a special way. Ceramic and porcelain floor tiles are fairly low maintenance, while coarse tiles such as slate, marble, granite, or limestone require individualized care and often specific cleaners.

How to Clean Ceramic and Porcelain Tile Floors

Ceramic and porcelain tiles are incredibly durable, and a few easy cleaning tips can keep these types of floors looking sparkling

Follow this simple process to clean ceramic and porcelain tile:

Clean up loose debris: Sweep or vacuum your tile floors regularly to keep them from getting dull. Ceramic tiles may be resistant to dirt, but sand and grit can dull the glazed surfaces.

Choose the right floor mop: Clean tile with mild detergent and clean water using a rag or chamois-type mop rather than a sponge mop. These mops are best for cleaning tile because sponge mops tend to push dirty water into the grout lines, making them harder to clean. Be sure to change the water frequently while mopping; dirty water equals a cloudy floor.

Be on the look for tile stains: If you find a discoloration, first try to determine what type of substance made the stain. Use the appropriate cleaner for the stain for the most effective clean.

Watch for soap residue: If your tiles look hazy even after cleaning, you might be dealing with soapy residue. Remove the film with a nonabrasive all-purpose cleaner. You could also try a homemade cleaner with mild acid (such as fresh lemon juice) on ceramic or porcelain tiles (but never on stone tiles).

Dry the tiles: Don’t let your glazed tile floors air-dry as the sitting water will form water spots. Take care of that by drying the floor with a clean, lint-free cloth immediately after washing

Hardwood flooring vs Tile Planks that look like hardwood. Pros and Cons.

I get a lot of calls and comments on my blog asking me whether I think hardwood floors or porcelain planks (that look like wood) are better? It’s a challenging question to answer both because “it depends” and because there are pros and cons for each option.

Many prefer hardwood, but they are concerned about scratching and water, especially if they are installing floors in a kitchen or if they have a dog. The answer to what’s best can also be shaped by your sub-floor (as this can impact cost) as well as your climate.

Now, I do want to preface this by explaining that there are 2 main structures for hardwood flooring – Solid and engineered hardwood. (You can read more about that in the linked article). For the purposes of this article, I’m comparing solid hardwood vs porcelain planks. Generally, solid hardwood flooring will last longer than engineered hardwood.

In general, if you are choosing between engineered wood (on concrete slab) vs tile (on a concrete slab), I would generally recommend tile over engineered wood, if all other things are equal

But if you are choosing between solid hardwood and tile planks, in my opinion, they are both good options. Of course each also has drawbacks, too and no floors are perfect. Only you can answer which of these factors are most important to you and therefore which option is better for you, your family and your home.

Hardwood Flooring Selection Made Easy

How to Choose & Install Hardwood Floors: A Complete Guide

The choice of flooring is one of the most basic yet important decisions a homeowner has to make when undertaking a renovation, as it underpins everything else. While there are plenty of different options, from carpet to terrazzo, one material is the acknowledged standard: hardwood.

But not all hardwood flooring is created equal, and selecting a product isn’t simply a matter of choosing a preferred color. A range of other factors can have an impact on both aesthetics and performance

To explore the many options available, we spoke with three experts: Scott Jones, director of product management at Carlisle Wide Plank Floors; James Caroll, principal of LV Wood; and Mara Miller, partner at the AD100 firm Carrier and Company Interiors. Once you find the perfect fit for your space, you’ll need to think about installation. While may choose to hire a professional to install their floors, some intrepid homeowners go the DIY route. If you’re ready to tackle the project yourself, Tony Pastrana, installation systems developer at Armstrong Flooring, shared his advice on how to install your own flooring.

Select Solid or Engineered Flooring

Traditionally, hardwood flooring came in thick planks of solid timber. Today, solid hardwood is still widely available, but many companies also offer engineered flooring—planks made with a thinner top layer of hardwood, bonded to other layers designed to prevent the floor from shifting during expansion and contraction cycles. “All wood moves in three directions: There’s tangential, radial, and longitudinal movement,” says Jones. “With engineered products, you’re creating opposing forces within the board to try to restrict the natural movement of the wood.”

Choose Prefinished or Site Finish

Hardwood planks can be purchased with a raw face that gets finished by a professional after installation, or prefinished, which arrives with the stain and topcoat already applied. The advantage of prefinished wood is that “you know exactly what you’re getting,” says Caroll, noting that once you select a product, you’ll have an exact sample to use in coordinating your home’s color palette and choosing other design elements, such as textiles, wall coverings, and cabinetry. Prefinished flooring also takes less time to install, because there’s no need to apply color or sealant. “When you choose to do a site finish,” he adds, “you’re rolling the dice a little bit, and relying on the skills of the flooring contractor to get it right.”

Choosing Hardwood Flooring

Board Widths. Select from narrow strips (less than three inches), wider planks (more than three inches), parquet squares, and—a new option—squares and rectangles. The traditional choice, strips give the illusion of more space, while planks impart a rustic look. Parquet floors, with the distinctive geometric design, suit formal spaces.

Wood Species. Hardwood species vary in durability, grain patterns, and color. Oak, maple, and cherry are among the most common species due to their hardness. Exotic woods like mahogany, and Brazilian cherry aren’t as durable, but are prized for their striking appearance

Colors. Hardwoods run the gamut from blond to black, depending on species and finish.

Textures. You can get hardwood floors that look shiny and new, or you can buy brand new wood that looks like an antique and adds timeworn character to your room Many manufacturers offer distressed and hand-scraped hardwoods that will disguise heavy use over the years and give the floor an appealing timeworn appearance from the moment it’s installed.

Hardness. For busy households with pets and kids, it’s a good idea to choose the hardest wood species possible. Hard species, such as red oak, will withstand wear and tear, while softer species, such as pine, tend to show scratches. The choice between engineered and solid hardwood will most likely be determined by location, subfloor, and preferred installation method. But if you’re on the fence, keep in mind choosing solid hardwood means scratches from a puppy’s claws or dings from a toddler’s toy can be sanded out and refinished over and over. Whichever you choose, preventive care and proper maintenance can keep your floors looking good for years.

Things to Consider When Choosing a Wood Floor

With the variety of woods, colors and finishes available today, shopping for a wood floor can be a bit overwhelming. Here are five things to know and consider when choosing the perfect wood floor for your home.

Homeowners evaluating new flooring owe it to themselves to consider the benefits and beauty of wood. Wood floors are comfortable, durable and surprisingly affordable, and nothing quite compares to the character and warmth they bring to every room in the house. While there is a myriad of choices available, not every type of wood flooring is suitable for every application. If you are shopping for a wood floor, here are five things to keep in mind.

Type of Wood Flooring

There are primarily two types of wood flooring products—solid hardwood and engineered hardwood. Solid wood flooring is milled from solid wood logs and is joined with a traditional tongue and groove along both the long and short edges. Solid wood is available prefinished or unfinished, in strips and planks ranging in thickness from 5/16 to ¾ inches. Strips are 1½-inch- to 2¼-inches-wide and planks are 3 to 8 inches wide.

Choice of Wood Species

There are many different types of woods used in flooring, but some are harder and therefore more durable than others. “Day to day wear and tear is what concerns most people when shopping for a wood floor,” says Schlegel, “and the benchmark for hardness in the U.S. is Red Oak.” While Red and White Oak are the most common domestic wood floors, Hickory and Maple (harder than oak) and Walnut (softer) are also popular choices. Top-selling exotic woods such as Brazilian Cherry, Brazilian Koa, and Cumaru are among the hardest species available. “Naturally, the harder the wood, the better it will be for wear and installation in high-traffic areas of the home,” Schlegel notes.

Grain, Color, and Appearance

Because wood flooring comes in so many different species, styles, and finishes, it is fairly easy to select a floor to match any room décor. If you have a country-style interior, wide plank floors with highly defined wood grains and a distressed appearance will be a good fit.  For Colonial homes, consider wide, random plank width flooring in Oak and Maple. For traditional interiors, hardwood flooring in widths of 2¼ to 3¼ inches in Oak, Maple, or Walnut, or parquet flooring, will be smart choices. Virtually any type of wood can be used in a contemporary setting, depending on what stain or finish is used—for example, pewter, dark charcoal, or whitewash finishes can transform any wood species into a modern masterpiece.

How to choose the best wood flooring

Looking to update your flooring and don’t know where to start? Wood flooring should be your first port of call. Why? Wood flooring creates a great backdrop to any contemporary interior, while functioning as a key aspect of a period home’s historic character.

WHICH WOOD COLOUR IS BEST FOR YOUR ROOM?

One of the many advantages of a timber floor is that the look of natural wood works well with many decorating styles, allowing versatility when you redecorate. But the wood flooring’s colour choice should be based on more factors that just your decorative scheme.

White and pale grey wood floors are perfect for low-traffic rooms, and their light colour will enhance space in a small room brilliantly. Contemporary and light-reflecting, they will however show up dirt and dents pretty quickly.

Warm, honey-toned wood floors will disguise dirt and create a welcoming feel, ideal for a large, open-plan space that you want to feel cosier. Less contemporary than paler wood floor finishes, mid-toned wood is perfect for creating a relaxed, more traditional finish.

Dark wood floors will create a more formal, intimate feel in a room, but can also be used in industrial-style spaces for a smart, contemporary finish, especially if used as a backdrop to show off light-coloured furniture.

Your Guide to the Different Types of Wood Flooring

If you’re thinking of putting in wood floors, you can’t go wrong. All types of hardwood floors have unmatched natural beauty and go with any decor — modern, traditional, country, you name it. Hardwood flooring goes in any room, although kitchens and basements warrant special considerations.

Unfinished or Finished?

Unfinished hardwood flooring is a good option if you want a custom stain applied before the final finish, or if you want to match the color of existing flooring. After hardwood flooring installation and staining, the flooring is given several coats of protective finish. If you’re thinking of adding hardwood flooring in your kitchen, unfinished flooring is a good choice because the finish will penetrate and seal the seams between boards, helping to prevent water from seeping between boards

Solid or Engineered?

Solid hardwood flooring is all wood and comes 5/8 to 3/4 inches thick. Because it’s solid wood, it can be sanded and refinished many times. However, it’s susceptible to changes in humidity, and isn’t recommended for below-grade basements

What Species Is Best?

The best hardwood floors are made with wood species that are readily available and — you guessed it — very hard. Oak flooring, maple flooring and cherry flooring are all good choices. Other species include bamboo (which is actually a grass), walnut, ash and mahogany. You’ll pay a premium price for more exotic species, such as teak, jarrah and mesquite. Check to make sure the hardwood flooring you choose comes from sustainably harvested forests.

Another option is reclaimed hardwood flooring, which you can find at salvage yards. It likely has some signs of wear and age, but you’ll pay about half what it would cost for comparable new flooring. If they don’t have what you’re looking for (and you have the time), ask to be put on a waiting list. Salvage flooring is an especially good choice if you’re renovating an older house.