Do Your Own Shingles Roof Maintenance Check

Choosing the Right Shingles For Your House

There are many different options when it comes to roofing shingles, which may be overwhelming for homeowners looking for new roof installation or replacement. For example, some roof shingles were designed for aesthetic appeal while others were built to be hardy and withstand the elements

Asphalt Shingles

As the most common type of roofing material used on the market, asphalt shingles are the go-to for most new homeowners or for roof replacements

3-tab asphalt shingles. 3-tab shingles are named due to the cutouts tabs that are layered on top of each other. This allows each shingle to look like it is three separate pieces, creating a dynamic and gorgeous 3D look. This particular shingle is the most affordable within the asphalt industry, usually costing anywhere between $.85-$1.50 per sq. foot. 3-tab shingles also have a lifespan of 10-20 years with proper maintenance.

Fiberglass Asphalt Shingles. This gorgeous shingle was created by weaving a fiberglass base mat, covering it with a waterproof asphalt coating, and topping it off with ceramic granules to shield against UV rays and to add a bit of sparkle. These shingles are fantastic for areas that generally receive a lot of rain. While fiberglass asphalt shingles provide more protection for your home, they do come at a bit of a higher cost than their 3-tab shingle brethren. Generally, a homeowner can expect to pay $1.00-$3.00 per sq. foot. As for life, Fiberglass shingles will last a homeowner anywhere from 20-40 years with proper maintenance.

Architectural Shingles. When it comes to aesthetics, it is hard to beat an architectural shingle. These shingles are designed to look like they were hand sculpted and come in many different shapes and colors, allowing homeowners the freedom to choose a style that fits their taste best. With an extra laminate layer, architectural shingles have a bit more glimmer and extra durability than both fiberglass and 3-tab asphalt shingles. However, these shingles are a bit more expensive, coming in at $1.50-$5.50 per square foot. You will see a return on your investment, though, due to the long lifespan of architectural shingles. These shingles can last a homeowner between 30-50  years with the proper maintenance.

How to Choose the Best Roof Shingles for Your Home

Replacing your roof is one of the most important purchases a homeowner can make. Based on this, it is important to understand the various options available. Asphalt shingle roofs are the least expensive and most popular option, followed by metal roofs, cedar roofs, slate roofs and clay roofs.

When talking to roofing contractors, you may be presented with many options to choose from, including style, colour, lifespan and type of warranty, and of course, price. Even for asphalt shingles alone, there are also many different brands from various manufacturers, with each brand carrying shingles that falls into three categories: Basic Shingles, Mid-Grade Shingles or Premium Shingles

How to decide which roof shingles best suits your roof

So how do you decide which roof shingle to go with? At Smart Roofing, we recommend using the best quality roof shingles while taking into account your budget. Do not simply go with the cheapest option and cheapest price, because as with anything, you get what you pay for. From our experience, higher quality roof shingles will give you the best value and highest warranty, protecting your roof for years to come.

Choose the right roofing contractors

we are dedicated to providing quality craftsmanship to our customers. We are certified Certainteed ShingleMaster™ roof contractors providing extended lifetime warranties from our manufacturers, which includes labour, material, removal and disposal, ensuring maximum lifetime protection from the manufacturer.

Tips for Choosing the Colour of Your Shingles

And how about changing the colour as well?

A roof is a major visual element, sometimes making up a third of the visible portion of your home. This is why you should take into consideration its colour and how well it goes with the house’s exterior surroundings. Making the right choice here can even have a positive impact on the value of your property.

Though sober hues may dominate the market, anything-but-neutral colours have their own fan base with homeowners looking for something a little different. Red, blue, or green roofs can be found from coast to coast, with a concentration of blue and green in the East.

Monochrome roofs are now a thing of the past. The demand is for shingles with nuances and variations. These can be variations on a theme, like two-tone black, or a mix of colours, like Weathered Rock, which combines, grey, brown, and even blue.

Architectural shingles are homeowners’ favourite

Offering a textured effect and more visible gradations of the main hue, architectural (laminate) shingles are the most popular seller at BP. That said, classic three-tab shingles, which offer a more uniform finish, are still quite popular, especially in the East.

Is colour really that important?

Do you doubt the positive impact on your property and its value of choosing the right colour? Read on! In addition to the fun of choosing, the colour of your roof may benefit your property by:

Harmonizing with its environment: Grey and black look great in an urban setting. However, shades of brown will blend in better when a roof is surrounded by trees.

Stand out from the crowd: In a neighbourhood where most of the roofs are brown, a black or grey roof will stand out and add a spark of originality.

Save energy: A dark roof that absorbs heat may be preferable in a colder climate, while a lighter-coloured roof that reflects heat could keep your house cooler in a warmer or more sunny areas.

How to Choose Shingles & Common Utah Roof Maintenance

What are roof shingles made of?

There are multiple types of roof shingles that are made from various materials to choose from.  The most common material used to make them is asphalt.  They are built with either a fiberglass or organic felt base.  Each of these bases are built as a large roll which is then run through a presaturation chamber and put into a saturation tank filled with hot asphalt that attaches the asphalt to the base.  Following the asphalt, different granular minerals are added.  The minerals allow the shingles to be different colors and keeps the roof protected from harmful UV rays.

Types of roof shingles

Asphalt is the most common type of roofing shingles due to their low cost, ease to install, durability, low maintenance costs and wide variety of colors and styles.  Cedar is another option you can choose and is usually found on older homes.  As cedar has become more rare (and thus more expensive), most new cedar shingles actually use new growth trees which are more vulnerable to wear and must be chemically treated.  The cost to buy, install, and maintain them have made these less common.  Choosing tile is also common in some climates.  The initial cost is high, but people choose tile because it can offer more durability, longer life, and better heat efficiency in extreme climates.

How often should you replace your roof?

The lifespan of a shingle installation varies widely based on the type you choose, and even the specific style of each type.  For example, many common asphalt shingles are rated for a 30-year lifespan, but some are rated for as little as ten or fifteen years.  Tile can be rated even longer.  The life span also greatly depends on the environment they are in and what work has been performed.  Extreme Utah weather such as winds, heat, or cold can greatly decrease how long a roof will last.

What causes roof leaks?

One of the biggest causes is simply the age of the roof.  Over time, the Utah weather will wear down or break shingles, resulting in leaks.  Clogged rain gutters is another common cause of leaks.  When the gutters don’t drain, the water can soak into the wood under the shingles.  This is an especially severe problem during the winter, when ice dams are common and can build up in gutters, causing water and ice to seep under the shingles and cause damage.  Choosing to perform regular checkups like routinely checking gutters is a simple way to ensure this doesn’t happen.  Lack of enough slope on the roof, improperly installed flashing, or excessive moisture all can create leaks.

Why does my roofing sag?

When a roof sags the most common reasons are that either there are faulty materials or too much weight, or a combination of the two.  The materials can wear down or even break causing sagging.  Regardless of the reason, sagging can be a sign of huge potential problems and should be checked by a Utah roofing contractor immediately.

What are the different types of roof shingles?

you can choose to replace or have installed on your home. Each one has different benefits, costs, materials, and style. We break down all shingled roof types below. Use our quick replacement roof cost chart to get an idea on how much you will spend for each.

Types of Roof Shingles

There are a few things to take into consideration when you are thinking of replacing your home’s roof with new shingles. A new shingled roof is a big investment, so you’ll want to take into consideration the cost to install certain roof shingle types as well as the lifespan you can expect from each

3 Tab Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt shingle roof costs are the most affordable as far as installation goes. They are the most common type of roof replacements or new home roof installations that homeowners choose. There are three main types of asphalt shingles: 3-tab asphalt, fiberglass asphalt, and architectural style asphalt shingles. 3 tab asphalt shingles are the most affordable shingle to install but they are thinner, have an organic-mat paper base, and wear out more quickly than fiberglass or architectural shingles.

Architectural Shingles

Architectural shingles are more durable than asphalt shingle options in comparison to 3 tab asphalt shingles. The give off a sculpted look and have an extra laminate layer which contours them to look a bit more designed. Architectural shingles cost a bit more to install at $1.50 to $5.50 per square foot or $150 to $550 per square. They come in more luxurious looking styles that homeowners prefer and can even simulate wood shake designs. Though they are more expensive, they can last up to twice as long as 3-tab asphalt shingles. Architectural asphalt shingles can last from 30 to 50 years or more with proper maintenance. Though some homeowners choose to DIY install a new roof, we highly suggest hiring a local roof contractor to complete the job.

Metal Roof Shingles

Metal roof shingles are stylish in appearance and there are many different color options available to pick from. Metal roof shingles are relatively easily to install and they are very lightweight, making them a good option for homes with a roof system that simply can’t support heavier options. Metal roofing can last from 75 to 100 years and has one of the longest lifespans in comparison to other roof types. Metal roof installation costs near you may differ depending on the average price for labor in your neighborhood. On average metal roofing shingles cost $2.80 to $3.85 per square foot or $280 to $385 per square. Metal roofing also comes in sheet panels as well.

Roof Inspection Safety Tips

Buying a New Home? A Roof Inspection Will Save You Money

Buying a new home is a huge life decision. Prospective buyers know they need to make sure their new dream home has a sound foundation and safe electrical wiring, but inspecting the roof is often overlooked. This is surprising, considering how integral roofs are to protecting a home, and how expensive a new roof can be.

According to the National Roof Certification and Inspection Association, roof deficiencies are the most common problem reported by home inspectors. But as we’ll explain, you won’t want to rely on just the home inspection. A certified Roof Inspector will be much more thorough and will be able to warn you about major upcoming expenses.

First Impressions: Inspecting the Roof Yourself

You can start to get an idea of the condition of a roof from the moment you go to view a potential home. Look for damaged or missing shingles on the roof, dry rot, and the condition of the gutters. Can you see moss growing on the roof? Is the roof sagging on one side?

When you can spot major problems from the ground, then you know there are likely to be costly repairs needed in the new future. If you know you won’t have the capital to buy the home and repair or even replace the roof, then you’ll know right off the bat that this home is not for you, before you spend money on a home inspection and roof certification.

How Much Will This Cost?

We know you’ll be wanting to save your pennies when you’re just about to shell out a lot of money on a new home, so you are probably wondering how much this will cost you. The average cost for a roof inspection is $650 and the average cost of a home inspection is between $500 to $700.

What to Expect During a Roof Inspection

The importance of your home’s roof really can’t be overstated. Without a solid, functioning roof, a house quickly turns into an uncomfortable place to live—not something any homeowner wants to endure. To protect your investment and your health, prioritize keeping your home’s roof in good shape.

How do you do that?

Well, as is the case with your home’s other systems, preventative maintenance is key. If they’re caught early, problems such as failed flashing, missing or torn shingles, and broken tiles are easier to fix and less likely to have already caused major problems to the structure or interior of the house.

Do I Need a Roof Inspection?

There are four main reasons you might need to have your roof looked at by a professional, says Louis. If your answer to any of the following questions is “yes,” a roof inspection needs to be in your future

Roof leaks and ceiling stains

In most homes, roof leaks aren’t quite as dramatic as they’re sometimes portrayed on television and in movies. Instead of racing around your house placing buckets and coffee cans under streams of water coming from the ceiling, it’s far more likely that you’ll begin to notice dark stains slowly spreading across the ceiling.

Purchasing a new home

If you’ve gone through the house-buying process before, you know how nerve-wracking the inspection and appraisal process can be. A home inspection is very important, but if there are major issues with one of the home’s systems—including the roof—consulting an expert is the smartest course of action

Buying a Home? Here’s Your Roof Inspection Guide

You’re investing hundreds of thousands into a pre-owned home and the last thing you want to find post purchase is a costly problem—especially in the roof.

Before the Offer: Look for Signs of Water Infiltration

To better shape your offer right out of the gate, look for potential roof problems the first time you see the house.

Whether it’s an open house or private showing, there are a number of things you can look for:

Water stains on ceiling — These are a dead giveaway of a leak in the roof.

Fresh ceiling paint — While not always a sign of a roof leak, it could be a sign that someone has tried to paint over water stains.

Curled shingles — If the home has asphalt shingles or cedar shakes, look for curling at the edges. This is a sign that the shingles are near the end of their usable life.

Missing shingles and tiles — Red alert: if shingles or tiles have been missing for a while, the roof may have water damage.

Water stains under the roof — Peak in the attic and look around for signs of water infiltration.

Water damaged fascia boards — Look for cracks and discoloration in the fascia boards around the roof. This can be a sign of an old roof.

With flat roofs or shingle roofs, it’s easy to spot potential problems since they’re more obvious. But tile roofs can look fine and dandy from the outside while hiding some serious problems—like a deteriorated felt underlayment. Protecting the roof from water, the underlayment deteriorates over time and needs replacing every 12-20 years. Ask the seller when’s the last time they had the underlayment replaced. If they start sweating profusely, you may need to reevaluate your offer

The answer: Yes, if the general inspector asks for it.

Home inspectors know enough to point out potential problems. But they’re not roofing experts. So when they see something that could be a sign of a bigger roof problem, they’ll usually recommend a separate roof inspection.

Roof Inspections – Are They Necessary?

In many states, especially those that see a higher amount of snow and hail, when buying a home it is usually requisite to have the roof certified from inspection. Matter of fact, many lenders required this to be done before they will cut a check. In most states, a properly ventilated roof can last 20 years or more. In states where the snow is heavy, they often have to be replaced every five years. While having a secure roof is one of the most important parts of a home, it can also be a very expensive investment, especially if you bought a home under the guise that everything was on the up and up.

Roofing Inspections

Roof inspections are simply inspections that determine the integrity of a roof, how long it may last, and when it will need to be replaced. Roof inspectors are not going to climb up on your roof or the roof of a home you are thinking of buying and pull up shingles or tiles. Roof inspectors have special procedures wherein they can determine the lifespan of a given roof without tearing into it. At first glance it might seem that roofing inspectors would have to pull up part of the roof to do a thorough examination, but if you consider your own roof, you would not want anyone tearing holes in it just to see if it was in good shape.

Are Roof Inspectors Different From Home Inspectors?

Roof inspectors also have super-technical techniques like infrared roof inspections where they don’t even have to touch the surface of the roof itself to determine a roof’s integrity. This process uses infrared rays to locate parts of a roof that are at higher or lower temperatures than the rest of the roof. These “hot spots” can show a roof inspector just exactly where heat is escaping

Play it Safe

Because replacing a roof can be quite an investment, insurance companies and lenders require that this has been checked off. It makes sense for these companies to protect their investments, but you as the homeowner should want this to be secured as well. You don’t want to be stuck with a bill that you weren’t expecting, and you also don’t want to sell a home to a family and put them in the same spot.

Roof inspections are not all that expensive, and these roofing inspections can give you and your lenders and insurance carriers peace of mind. Because when the rain is coming down or there is a foot of snow weighing down your roof, you want to sleep comfortably knowing that you are secure from above.

HOW TO INSPECT YOUR ROOF

WHAT TO LOOK FOR AND WHEN TO CALL A PROFESSIONAL

Too many of us take our roofs for granted — it’s not something we think about unless there’s a problem. But as your home’s first line of defense against the elements, your roof goes through a lot of wear and tear, so it’s important to do a yearly visual inspection as part of your home maintenance routine. By giving your roof a brief inspection, small problems won’t lead to giant catastrophes.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Inspecting your roof does not mean walking on the roof. Roof walking is dangerous and best left to the professional. So first things first, stay off the roof!

From the safety of the ground or through a window, perform a visual inspection of the roof with binoculars. Remember: A roof is designed to age over time. Even a one-year-old roof will look different than a roof that was just installed. But by inspecting your roof regularly, you can spot changes and potential problems.

Look for shingles that are missing or loose, or show signs of heavy wear or degradation (bald spots, granule loss, or severe curling), as these are considered weak points where water can penetrate and cause leaks. While it is normal for asphalt shingles to experience some curling, significant or abnormal curling are indicators that your shingles are reaching the end of their useful life.

GETTING A CLOSER LOOK

After a preliminary inspection from the ground a closer look may be necessary. Safely climb a ladder to get a closer look at your roof. But stay off the roof itself — not only is it dangerous to walk on the roof, you can potentially do more damage to the shingles.